THE ALL NEW 2016 Honda HR-V CROSSOVER

 

 

 

Video Gallery
First Look: 2016 Honda HR-V
First Look: 2016 Honda HR-V
2016 Honda HR-V First Drive Review: A Small, Peppy New Age Crossover
2016 Honda HR-V First Drive Review: A Small, Peppy New Age Crossover
2016 Honda HR-V - First Look
2016 Honda HR-V - First Look
2016 Honda HR-V Walkaround | AutoMotoTV
2016 Honda HR-V Walkaround | AutoMotoTV

 


 

The HR-V mixes angles and curves in an attractive design that lends it a sporty look while hiding its budget-friendly roots. A 141-hp 1.8-liter four comes with either a six-speed manual or CVT and front- or all-wheel drive. Many safety features are available, and the flat-folding second-row provides cargo-hauling bragging rights. Load it up with extras like lane-departure warning, a seven-inch touch-screen display, and a vehicle telematics system and the HR-V becomes a high-tech haven.

 


 


 

If you’re looking for an SUV but your budget and parking space are small, Honda’s hoping you’ll check out its new HR-V. Based on the Honda Fit subcompact, the entry-level HR-V joins the category of smaller SUVs that may appeal to buyers seeking all-season traction in a versatile, urban-friendly package.

The HR-V will compete in a growing segment, populated by the Chevrolet Trax, Jeep Renegade and upcoming Mazda CX-3. Starting price for the Honda is likely to be under $20,000.

While slightly longer and taller than the Fit, the HR-V is smaller (and less costly) than the popular CR-V. And like the Fit, the HR-V gets a trick rear seat that flips up or folds down flat, which allows it to accommodate a surprising amount of cargo. It swallowed four garden chairs with space to spare.

 


 

 

 

Starting at $19,995